Should you be able to opt out of vaccinations?

Why would you? It protects your children and others they might meet. Vaccines are safe and effective. You can look at the data and see for yourself. This is what happened when the measles vaccination became available.
measlespicture/

 

We know vaccines’ safety record from clinical trials before they were licensed, and from millions of doses administered after they were licensed. And we know there is no plausible biologic reason to believe vaccines would cause any serious long-term effects. Based on more than 50 years of experience with vaccines, we can say that the likelihood that a vaccine will cause unanticipated long-term problems is extremely low.
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/parents-guide/parents-guide-part4.html

Because of age, health conditions, or other factors, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines for each vaccine.

ironlingward
Iron Lung Ward, 1953
Polio used to be very common in the U.S. and caused severe illness in thousands of people each year before polio vaccine was introduced in 1955. Polio was eradicated in the Americas by 1994. Polio was officially eradicated in 36 Western Pacific countries, including China and Australia in 2000. Europe was declared polio-free in 2002. India  will be declared as a polio-free country this year. As of 2008, polio remains endemic in only three countries: Nigeria, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. All a plane ride away. So inoculate!

If you are afraid to take a chance to save your child from polio measlesor measles fine. Just don’t bring your kid around mine. Home teach them. Don’t go to Disneyland (Maybe someone with build a theme park for the non-inoculated.). And prepare to take care of them when they get sick because in all likelihood, they will. Your choice affects my choice. Your freedom affects my freedom. That’s just not going to work.

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